Beyond Rapid Urbanization, Rural Life Still Exists in Cow Farms in Chino, Calif.

SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. -Rapid urban development in San Bernardino has surrounded the dairy preserve, and about half of the 400 dairies have moved during the last 10 years.  In the past, the town of Chino had thousands of acres of land catered to cow farming. According to 1997 state Department of Food & Agriculture figures, San Bernardino was the number three dairy-producing county in the state with $440 million in annual production. 

The recent housing developments within the last ten years reduced the cow farming industry to a very low percentage. Mega-developers bought most of the cow farms and urbanized the farmlands with roads,  schools, middle-class houses, and shopping complexes. The population grew, together with the pollution, traffic and growing threats to the existing Chino cow farms.

Meanwhile, the existing dairy farms continue to nourish the cows with care, making sure cows are healthy to produce milk. Here is a look at the rural life in some of  the dairy farms. It might just be the last frontier.

The tractor pushes the hays to the side at 3 p.m., to feed the cows in one of the surviving farms in Chino Calif. (Photo by Joe Quintana (c) 2014/ TheQReports.com)

The tractor pushes the hays to the side, to feed the cows in one of the surviving farms in Chino Calif. (Photo by Joe Quintana (c) 2014/ TheQReports.com)

The 45-year old Pedro Marquez has been taking care of the cows in this Chino farm since 1988. “I have been with cows all my adult life. This place used to be known for cows…but now no more,” said Marquez. (Photo by Joe Quintana (c) 2014/ TheQReports.com)

The 45-year-old Pedro Marquez has been taking care of the cows in this Chino farm since 1988. “I have been with cows all my adult life,” said Marquez. (Photo by Joe Quintana (c) 2014/ TheQReports.com)

A designated number labels the ears of the cow for easy identification. The numbers are color coordinated to distinguish cows from other nearby farms. (Photo by Joe Quintana (c) 2014/TheQReports.com)

A designated number labels the ears of the cow for easy identification. (Photo by Joe Quintana (c) 2014/TheQReports.com)

Marquez worries that the growing development and summer heat endanger the cow’s survival. “We will have to move out soon, I just don’t know when and where,” said Marquez. (Photo by Joe Quintana (c) 2014/TheQReports.com)

Marquez thinks of better ways to make the cows happy. (Photo by Joe Quintana (c) 2014/TheQReports.com)

20140810_Cows_in_Chino_05.jpg. Misty water sprays the cows during the hot summer days to provide temporary relief and avoid fatality. There are 2300 cows in his farm and cows die everyday of heat exhaustion and urbanization related issues. “I have to take care of whatever is left behind…these cows are my livelihood, and they are the milk and butter in people’s breakfast tables,” said Marquez. (Photo by Joe Quintana (c) 2014/ TheQReports.com)

Misty waters spray the cows during the hot summer days to provide temporary relief from heat exhaustion. (Photo by Joe Quintana (c) 2014/ TheQReports.com)

© 2014 Joe Quintana

 

 

Author: Joe Quintana, M.A. | Multimedia Journalist
Editor-in-Chief at Journalism for the Soul
Master of Arts - Multimedia Journalism.